Category Archives: WWOOFing

Ending Winter

After two and half months away from snow and subzero temperatures, our family of winter vagabonds has returned to the glorious North.

seed starting greenhouse slumbering in the snow

It was a successful journey – we weren’t sure what to expect from our first roadtrip with Otis, given the long drives, strange places, and constant change. Fortunately, he loved the shifting locales and characters, and we quickly found ways to make the 4,000+ mile trek bearable for the little guy while strapped into his safety bucket. He met countless animals, rode in boats, enjoyed parades, had his first tastes of so many foods, loved the Ocean, and learned to walk. It was a momentous journey for a guy not yet a year old – and a joy for us to guide him on.


Otis and one of the many goats he met along the way

Given the uncertainties, we’d planned our route around friendly farms that we’d visited before, where they know us and were excited to meet our spawn. We revisited our friends at Wu Wei Farm, Habitable Spaces, the Chastain Farms, and Yokna Bottoms Farm as we looped through the south, in between visiting family and friends along the route.

(these are statues and not our actual families.)

The winter wandering went so well that we’ve decided that we will continue to do our winter snowbirding, rather than build a more permanent cozy winter dwelling on the farm (yet, anyway).

While we were away, the Best Neighbors Ever kept the farm’s driveway clear, and even shoveled off our front steps in anticipation of our arrival – of course, we’ll still have some snow to battle as we get settled in to start seeds for the year, clearing access to the woodpiles, greenhouses, outhouse, root cellar, chicken coop, and storage spaces … or maybe we’ll get lucky, and it’ll all melt in the next few days?

a welcoming driveway awaits us

I feel my mental gears grinding slightly as they shed the winter’s rust, switching back into Farm Mode. We’ve ordered our seeds for the season (Kristin is more than ready to get the onions started ASAP!), volunteers are getting lined up, and we’re signing up members for this year’s CSA.

It was a lovely winter and a wonderful journey – but we are happy to be home, and ready to rock.

Bring the Spring!

Snowbird Farmers: Winter Four

We’re back home in the li’l trailer on the tundra – single digits outside.

Looking out at the frozen winterscape, it’s hard to believe that just over a week ago, we were petting a manatee with our bare feet.

The wind moans and shrills at the trailer windows, but somehow cannot compete with the quiet cozy cracklings and shifting thumps of burning logs in the woodstove  – sounds made somehow even warmer knowing these are logs that we’d downed, hauled, split, and stacked to dry.

We just got home from our fourth winter as snowbirding farmers, thanks to the WWOOF-USA program, which connects organic farms with folks interested in helping out for room, board, experience … and, in our case, warmer climates.

This year, we decided to make our southernmost-point the Florida Keys, as we had on our “working honeymoon” trip when we first left Minneapolis in 2013. Both of our parents had plans to be there in late February, so we mapped out a course that would gradually take us there over the course of a few months – stopping to help out at other farms along the way.

Our first stop was at the Wu Wei Farm in Nixa, Missouri – we just knew it would be a good fit, given the name, which references the Taoist concept of natural action, without struggle or excessive effort  … the “cultivation of a mental state in which actions are effortlessly in alignment with the flow of life.

How very “que sera, sera!” Unsurprisingly, we felt right at home with the people, the space, the animals, and the river, and we know we’ll be back someday soon. Even the rocks in the field were awesome – while helping dig up potatoes, we discovered stone age Indian artifacts – flint flakes, a broken arrowhead, and a hand-held chopper tool.

As winter deepened, we headed deeper into the south, following the sun to return for our third time to a friendly and familiar spot – Yokna Bottoms Farm in Oxford, Mississippi.

We spent a few weeks with Doug and the dog pack, enjoying an unusual warm spell, which allowed us to continue to harvest and sell veggies at market well past the point that a killing frost would usually have brought things to a close.

As we had during both our previous winter stops at Yokna, we pulled everything out of the shed by the field and reorganized it – but this time, we decided to do something about the lack of organization, and built a sturdy set of shelving along one wall, using scrap lumber.

From there it was onward to another familiar farm – The Chastain Farms in Alabama, which we’d last visited during the polar vortex of 2014. It was awesome seeing all the little upgrades we’d put together in the WWOOFer cabin still in use three years later – the truck topper pot rack, the barnwood bathroom shelf, door, and floor, etc – and of course, seeing the folks.

We canned several dozens of jars of their frozen farm-grown strawberries (pictured) and tomatoes, turning them into jams, salsas, and BBQ sauce.
We canned several dozens of jars of their frozen farm-grown strawberries (pictured) and tomatoes, turning them into jams, salsas, and BBQ sauce.

Mama pig! She would jump up on the fence if you made eye contact and talked nice to her.
Mama pig! She would jump up on the fence if you made eye contact and talked nice to her.

 

We had a bit of a gap between farms to fill, so we paid a visit to our Facebook friend Jacqueline, in the beautiful mountains of North Carolina. She’d been smacked with a case of the winter sickness, so in the mode of WWOOFers, we looked for ways to help out.

There was a cold snap and homes in the area aren’t really insulated for such weather, so we cut up some dead trees and kept a toasty fire going in her woodstove, warming the house while we chatted, made food, and dusted and cleaned her amazing museum-quality array of teapots, curios, and knick-knacks.

a fraction of Jacqueline's amazing teapot collection - a wonderful environment since I'd launched into this lifestyle with help from a couple of teapots that taught me to trust intuition and flow!
a fraction of Jacqueline’s amazing teapot collection – a wonderful environment since I’d launched into this lifestyle with help from a couple of teapots that taught me to trust intuition and flow!

Jacqueline introduced us to her friend Pat, who brought us (by Jeep) up to her off-grid mountain cabin and organic orchard where she’d been living for decades, getting her water from a stream and doing without even solar electricity … it was inspiring.

Jacqueline in front of Pat's off-grid homestead
Jacqueline in front of Pat’s off-grid homestead

From there it was onto another new spot – Rag & Frass Farm in Jeffersonville, Georgia.

WWOOFers there are expected to work 6 days a week, waking at sunrise and knocking off at sunset –  a far more busy schedule than most.

We were glad to be there and happy to help out – the work was varied and interesting … we did standard farm work such as seeding thousands of plants, and weeding, broadforking, and mulching thousands of row feet, of course.

But we also worked on all sorts of random projects that were both fun and satisfying – removing nails and screws from reclaimed lumber; tearing out musty old ceiling tiles and rotten asbestos floor tiles from the motel rooms; fashioning doorknobs from branches, lawn chair seats from old flooring, and a towel rack from a broomstick; optimizing lighting and doors; building a handwashing sink, a counter for the roadside stand, a swiveling 20-foot produce washing/drying table, and several gates;  clearing out and organizing the barn, a storage room, and the wild brambles behind the motel; repairing the kitchen table, several chairs and stools and a vintage fan … you get the idea.

the wash/dry rack project
the wash/dry rack project

two of the three barn stall gates
two of the three barn stall gates

reclaimed lumber counter/table project
reclaimed lumber counter/table project

It felt great knowing we were making an impact and leaving a positive mark on a growing operation – and we knew that once we left, it would be three weeks of lazy fishing and sunshine down in Florida …

donkeys are good people
donkeys are good people

 

Nearly a month later, it was time to mosey southward again – we spent a week in an RV park marina on a giant lake in the Florida panhandle with our friend Chris.

a small portion of our magnet-fishing haul - throwing a powerful magnet on a cord out along the marina docks, and carefully dragging it back in with treasures ...
a small portion of our magnet-fishing haul – throwing a powerful magnet on a cord out along the marina docks, and carefully dragging it back in with treasures …

Then we hit the Keys for two weeks with our folks, soaking up precious sunlight, ordering seeds, and preparing to get back to work on The Farm …

coconut harvesting
coconut harvesting

coconut processing
coconut processing

coconut cake
coconut cake

homeward bound, dreaming of frisbee
homeward bound, dreaming of frisbee

 

… and writing this website update was one of the items on our to-do list, perfect to accomplish while even the high temperatures are still below freezing.

It was a great winter, and looks to me like the forecast calls for an even greater growing season.

We’ve already started the first seeds of the season, and we’re ready to keep them alive through the freezing nights of our northern spring.

Welcome to 2017, thanks for joining us in another year’s adventure!

Winter WWOOFing 2016

In late November, we tucked the Farm in for the season, ready for its sleepy cover crop of snow, and headed southward toward our planned route of other organic farms, where we would live and work through the WWOOF-USA program.

It was a good plan, a great route – but as we all know, what will be will be – and it’s rarely just what we had in mind. As it turned out, we first had to endure some loss this Winter. First, sweet mighty Cleo lost the use of her legs, after 15 years of the finest companionship a dog has ever provided man.

We kept her comfortable and happy til the very end, let her sleep in the bed with us, rolled her to her favorite places in a padded wagon, gave her all the love and treats that she wanted, and said our goodbyes at my sister’s house in Illinois.

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Immediately afterward, my Mom’s health began to slide, as the cancer she’d kept at bay for a decade came back to roost. We turned back North, cancelled our plans to return to Yokna Bottoms Farm in Mississippi, and spent the month of December in my Minnesotan childhood home helping prepare the house for sale and my mom for a move into an assisted living facility.

By January, things had stabilized enough that we packed up the trailer again and hit the road for Texas – now with my mom’s dog Ace joining our family entourage. It would be just another month before I had to come back North  …

Habitable Spaces (Kingsbury, Texas)

We’d spent almost the entire winter last year at this unique artists’ residency, and it was wonderful to return to see our human and animal friends, all that’s changed and endured.

Scout modeling an imported Que Sehra pumpkin
Scout modeling an imported Que Sehra pumpkin

 

tile remnant puzzle floor completed
tile remnant puzzle floor completed

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adopted feral Egyptian Geese (which are technically not geese, or ducks - but "shelducks." in the space between the two
adopted feral Egyptian Geese (which are technically not geese, or ducks – but “shelducks.” in the space between the two

the simple rocket stove we built last year, keeping water boiling for feather plucking
the simple rocket stove we built last year, keeping water boiling for feather plucking

  

chewing up, spitting, lumping , and drying out some dried, rehyrdrated, limed Que Sehra corn ...
chewing up, spitting, lumping , and drying out some dried, rehyrdrated, limed Que Sehra corn …

... to make chicha!
… to make chicha!

 

a walk through the woods discovery
a walk through the woods discovery

one mile to go
one mile to go

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I love Burl.

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loved eating from the earth oven we built last winter
loved eating from the earth oven we built last winter

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the Ward Sisters installing a new door
the Ward Sisters installing a new door

the Ward Sisters nursing ducklings
the Ward Sisters nursing ducklings

 

catmouflage
catmouflage

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Biodiverse Food Forest HomeGreen Permaculture Center (Rockport, Texas)

Their goals here are as lofty as their name is long – to transform a sandy, neglected, abused little parcel of land into a lush symbiotic edible ecosystem. Meredith and her mom are just getting things cleaned up and starting to grow – we helped them out wherever we could, and enjoyed the proximity of the ocean, in between.

first encounter with the barnyard gang
first encounter with the barnyard gang

 

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doing some exploring by the Texas coast
doing some exploring by the Texas coast

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found a lot of fossilized wood in our down time
found a lot of fossilized wood in our down time

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fossilized poop! for real. AKA a "coprolite" - I had to lick it to convince Kristin it wasn't just a sun-dried poop of recent vintage. Even then, she was skeptical ...
fossilized poop! for real. AKA a “coprolite” – I had to lick it to convince Kristin it wasn’t just a sun-dried poop of recent vintage. Even then, she was skeptical …

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our MN friend Lizzy was visiting nearby Corpus Christi, and showed us a great beach
our MN friend Lizzy was visiting nearby Corpus Christi, and showed us a great beach

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#WWOOFerAmenities
#WWOOFerAmenities

 

a rooster checking out the new roost / laying boxes we built
a rooster checking out the new roost / laying boxes we built

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Loss Interlude

Immediately after leaving Rockport, I got a call from my sister – my Mom was fading fast. I got on a northbound plane immediately, while Kristin and the dogs drove West toward our final host farm in New Mexico.

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After a powerful and surprisingly positive week helping my mother make the transition into the great unknown, I flew back to rejoin them with a refreshed appreciation for life.

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Last Word Ranch (Los Cerrillos, NM)

If the native soil in coastal Texas had been  poor or challenging, the soil here in the high-altitude desert was barren and blasted. Irradiated by the sun and scattered by the howling winds, very little plant life grew – outside of the carefully nurtured gardens and the high tunnel packed with the aquaponics symbiotic system they’d just started up – fish living in water filtered by edible plants that used the fish waste as nutrients, a Rube Goldberg system as interconnected and unlikely as all of Life.

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Kristin gluing together scraps of tarp to line the new raised grow bed that Kristin and Dee built before I got there
Kristin gluing together scraps of tarp to line the new raised grow bed that Kristin and Dee built before I got there

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sifting soil for the growbed
sifting soil for the growbed

otherWWOOFer Ali, Dee Word (89 years old & always working harder than anyone), and Gabe finishing up the filling of the new raised grow bed
otherWWOOFer Ali, Dee Word (89 years old & always working harder than anyone), and Gabe finishing up the filling of the new raised grow bed

Jedi, Dee's sidekick
Jedi, Dee’s sidekick

sol in the solar panels
sol in the solar panels

refurbishing solar thermal panels with Dee - these use copper piping and fins to heat fluid as it flows through
refurbishing solar thermal panels with Dee – these use copper piping and fins to heat fluid as it flows through

Kristin took the reigns of the farm Instagram account and started making wonderful collages like this ...
Kristin took the reigns of the farm Instagram account and started making wonderful collages like this …

the local Pinion Pines had been ravaged by boring beetles - which resulted in an abundance of fragrant resin globs all over the place, just waiting to be collected and turned into incense ...
the local Pinion Pines had been ravaged by boring beetles – which resulted in an abundance of fragrant resin globs all over the place, just waiting to be collected and turned into incense …

 

one of several loaves of sourdough that Kristin made
one of several loaves of sourdough that Kristin made

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down in the arroyo
down in the arroyo

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sun & wind blasted - and loving it
sun & wind blasted – and loving it

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twisted, living arroyo bouquet
twisted, living arroyo bouquet

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gunshot gravestone in the old Los Cerrillos cemetary
gunshot gravestone in the old Los Cerrillos cemetary

good fine print, there
good fine print, there

Dee drilling holes through the trailer bed. If I'm half as active at half his age, I'll be doing good I reckon ...
Dee drilling holes through the trailer bed. If I’m half as active at half his age, I’ll be doing good I reckon …

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took an afternoon to see Santa Fe - wound up climbing a mountain in a snow storm.
took an afternoon to see Santa Fe – wound up climbing a mountain in a snow storm.

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Farmer Gene tends the Barrelponics system
Farmer Gene tends the Barrelponics system

hard to tell from the pic, but this was the biggest piece of petrified wood I've ever found
hard to tell from the pic, but this was the biggest piece of petrified wood I’ve ever found

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Looking Ahead

Although the loss of Cleo and my mom  made this one of the emotionally coldest winters in the personal record books, it was not a bad winter. We shed so many tears, but death is an inevitable part of living – and life is a wonderful thing indeed. We met lovely people, reconnected with friends, bonded with family, learned, and laughed – and we are coming into Spring ready to keep on growing; forward, upward, and ahead.

Thank you all, again, for being part of this journey.

Love,

Gabe, Kristin, Widget, and Ace

creating an Earth Oven

We’ve wanted to build an earth oven for some time now – we have a small camper oven, but it doesn’t really work that well, and we like to use the abundant free oak wood for fuel when we can, rather than pay for propane. We finally got our chance to try our hands at it at Habitable Spaces – where they encouraged us to build some kind of structure before we left.

Three unrelated projects that we’d helped with in December & January led us to decide on the earth oven build:

First, when we were digging postholes to fence off their first major field, we discovered that the subsoil was a rich, malleable clay, perfect for sculpting and building with.

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Kristin & Ali digging post holes

 

Secondly, we dismantled and felled the giant tower, made from three massive cable spools stacked upon one another – revealing a perfectly useable concrete foundation pad beneath.

Lily posing on the tower foundation - the 3 spools can be seen in the background where we rolled them away post-demo
Lily posing on the tower foundation – the 3 spools can be seen in the background where we rolled them away post-demo

 

Third, we’d spent a lot of time scavenging the ruins of two old homesteads on their property, which had been home to Shane’s grandmother and other ancestors. We metal detected and scrounged, and Gabe created a skullpture with items we discovered throughout January.

Lola helping Kristin scavenge in the ruins of Shane's grandmother's Depression-era homestead
Lola helping Kristin scavenge in the ruins of Shane’s grandmother’s Depression-era homestead

 

"Homestead #2" required us to chop down a thick stand of cacti to get to ... prickly work
“Homestead #2” required us to chop through a thick stand of cacti to get to … prickly work

 

Kingsbury Totem: wild boar skull with homestead bullet, board knots, cow bell, bed spring, melted aluminum blobs, & other artifacts, secured with scraps of old barbed wire etc
Kingsbury Totem: wild boar skull with homestead bullet, board knots, cow bell, bed spring, melted aluminum blobs, & other artifacts, secured with scraps of old barbed wire etc

 

In our scavenging, we discovered piles of old bricks, and several dozen partially-buried split limestone blocks, at both sites – these had once been house foundations. We’d excavated them when we found them, and left them propped up on the surface for possible retrieval later on.

Once we realized we wanted to create an earth oven, we decided these blocks would be the perfect base to build upon – beautiful, free, and full of the character and history of the land. So we borrowed the farm truck and a wheelbarrow, and got to collecting …

all the foundation blocks from Homestead #2 - we got another load the next day from Shane's Grandma's place. (we'd brought home a load of bricks from both sites weeks earlier without any specific plan for them)
all the foundation blocks from Homestead #2 – we got another load the next day from Shane’s Grandma’s place. (we’d brought home a load of bricks from both sites weeks earlier without any specific plan for them)

 

Kristin ordered a book on earth oven construction – this would be our Bible for the duration of the construction project that we embarked on, not sure if we’d even have time to finish it before we had to head to Austin in three weeks …

We began mortaring in the blocks, one tier at a time, spending hours fitting the stones together with minimal gaps and maximum stability/levelness.

Lily hanging out inside of tier one - the largest & thickest foundation blocks
Lily hanging out inside of tier one – the largest & thickest foundation blocks

 

as we neared the top, we worked in two tiers of old homestead bricks - and were proud (& sort of amazed!) when the top was level across from side to side in all directions
as we neared the top, we worked in two tiers of old homestead bricks – and were proud (& sort of amazed!) when the top was level across from side to side in all directions

 

we filled gaps with flame-colored flint rocks, thinking they looked emberesque. (The true color of the blocks shows most clearly when wet - it will be some time before the chalky mortar dust finishes washing off)
we filled gaps with flame-colored flint rocks, thinking they looked ember-esque. (The true color of the blocks shows most clearly when wet – it will be some time before the chalky mortar dust finishes washing off)

 

 

Next we mixed the first batch of insulation – clay slip and pine shavings – the shavings dry up and even burn out completely, leaving air pockets and a clay-foam heat barrier.

mixing insulation from clay slip & pine shavings
mixing insulation from clay slip & pine shavings

 

The insulating clay was used to fill a foot-deep layer designed to prevent the infinite thermal heat sink of the ground from leaching away the oven’s heat. We included a layer of wine bottles, and a layer of beer bottles (from the bottle house supply pile) – these would form stable insulating air pockets within the insulation clay.

wine bottle layer being filled in with clay slip/wood shaving insulation mud
wine bottle layer being filled in with clay slip/wood shaving insulation mud

 

we'd found a racoon skull in the woods back in January - the scavenger spirits wanted it included within the base, so we packed it with sand and tucked it in, where it will likely remain for a century or two ...
we’d found a racoon skull in the woods back in January – the scavenger spirits wanted it included within the base, so we packed it with sand and tucked it in, where it will likely remain for a century or two …

 

Kristin does the Tamping Dance - we filled the lower base with a mix of sand and crushed glass (necks left over from bottle bricks used in the ongoing bottle-house construction, visible in the background)
Kristin does the Tamping Dance – we filled the lower base with a mix of sand and crushed glass (necks left over from bottle bricks used in the ongoing bottle-house construction, visible in the background)

 

Once we got within four inches of the top of the base, we paused to mix up a batch of “oven mud” – clay and coarse sand. Oven mud clay is designed to hold heat for baking – it would be roughly the same clay used to build the interior of the oven dome, later on.

it turned out that mixing oven mud barefoot was not the happy hippie dance party that we'd been led to believe it would be.
it turned out that mixing oven mud barefoot was not the happy hippie dance party that we’d been led to believe it would be.

The sand we were using was quite rough & coarse  – ideal for structural stability, but also quite good at abrading one’s feet completely off.  We quickly switched to our rubber muck boots for stomp-mixing. (It might have been easier if the mix was wetter, but we wanted to avoid slumping and long drying times, so we kept it as dry as possible.)

The first batch of oven mud was used to make an oven pad, in the same dimensions as the firebrick interior baking floor would have (we laid out the firebricks on the ground to determine the measurements).

We created a wood frame and packed it with the oven mud to make a subfloor heat pad
We created a wood frame and packed it with the oven mud to make a subfloor heat pad

 

Then we filled in the surrounding gaps with more insulation mix, keeping everything level with the top exterior bricks.

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In the meantime, we’d created several “test bricks” with different proportions of sand and clay – as well as one of pure soil (from the layer above the clay, but beneath the topsoil).

For the oven interior dome, we wanted to find what ratio would be strongest, and crack or shrink the least.  The bricks dried out over a couple of days while we prepared for next steps and gave the water-soaked base insulation time to dry out some.

We decided that a ration of 1.5 parts sand to 1 part clay was our ideal target, based on the test bricks
We decided that a ratio of 1.5 parts sand to 1 part clay was our ideal target, based on the test bricks

Next we worked on the arch opening. The book said that the ideal opening height was 63% of the interior dome, but we had to go just slightly higher to get a nice stable arch, with good supportive edge-to-edge contact throughout. We also tested to make sure that Habitable Spaces’ pizza peel would fit through (yep, just right!)

laying out the arch, using scavenged homestead bricks. Old bricks are actually better than most modern bricks for durability under heat stress.
laying out the arch, using scavenged homestead bricks – old bricks are actually better than most modern bricks for durability under heat stress.

 

The resulting arch shape was traced onto plywood – Ali helped cut out two pieces in the proper shape and build a form by joining them together with 2x4s. This supported the bricks while we spaced them out with pebbles, and filled in the gaps with oven mud mortar.

We had to shave a 1/4" off the bottom in order to keep the height low while still allowing shims beneath - these shims would allow us to easily remove the form later.
We had to shave a 1/4″ off the bottom in order to keep the height low while still allowing shims beneath – these shims would allow us to easily remove the form later.

We also started work on the protective roof – while rain wouldn’t destroy the oven, it would saturate the clay, requiring many more hours of firing time to get it up to temp, and shortening the working life of the oven.  There were a couple short pieces of roofing left over from the house and kitchen, perfect for our needs. We scavenged together some cedar posts and scraps with lovely knotty character, wanting to make the roof match the organic, natural appeal of the oven’s base.

Before starting the next phase of the build, we mixed up a huge batch of oven mud, making it a little bit wet and leaving time for it to dry out a bit, before we launched the most significant single piece of the construction – the interior dome.

we decided to test out the concrete mixer for making the oven mud - and boy was it a time and effort saver! (Especially since we wound up making two to three times more than we actually needed ...)
we decided to test out the concrete mixer for making the sand & clay for the oven mud – and boy was it a time and effort saver! (Especially since we wound up making two to three times more than we actually needed …) We still foot/tarp mixed it, but only after a pre-mix tour through the mixer

First, we built the sand mold, like a sandcastle – this was the shape of what would become the void within the oven. We sprayed it with water and patted it tightly as we worked, attempting to create a smooth, flowing interior that fire and hot gas would roll through nicely.

building the void - sand form almost completed (with the beginnings of the roof visible in the background)
building the void – sand form almost completed (with the beginnings of the roof visible in the background)

 

The hardest part of the sand form was the newspaper layer, which would help us remove the sand from the clay later – it was frustrating to get it to stay smooth and in place, but we learned as we went, using lots of water, and smaller pieces of paper.

The sand form and the oven mud interior layer had to be done the same day – we we launched immediately into it.

packing the oven mud interior layer
packing the oven mud interior layer

 

The going was slow, as we carefully packed the oven mud into place, a fist-sized chunk at a time, maintaining a consistent 3″ thickness, and only applying force into existing clay (not into the fragile sand form). A CD we’d bought in Austin from the musician Kiko Villamizar played on repeat for hours – it was not the first or the last time the album provided the soundtrack to our work, but it was the longest continuous stretch.

We each worked from one side of the arch to the back, meeting in the middle – and then switched sides for the next layer, so that any idiosyncrasies in our individual methods would be evenly distributed on either side, and layered with the other’s style.

step by step, blob by blob - higher & higher ... the oven mud layer slowly formed
step by step, blob by blob – higher & higher …

 

Darkness fell, and we set up lights on each side so we could finish the vital layer.

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While the interior oven mud layer dried, we left it alone and spent a day working on the protective roof, not wanting to impatiently cause a collapse.

Once it seemed dry and stable, we filled in a couple of drying cracks with oven mud, and pulled out the arch form to reveal the sand within.

sand behind the arch form - we let it sit open to help the oven mud dry out more from within
sand behind the arch form – we let it sit open to help the oven mud dry out more from within

 

Then it was time to scoop out the sand form, and create the void.

 

removing sand form, with the roof in the background
removing sand form, with the roof in the background

 

interior layer complete! the five firebricks within and beneath the arch are not for baking (they lack the thick subfloor heat pad - the outer  support the arch, and the inner 3 allow bread or pizza to be slid in and out from the baking surface)
interior layer complete! the five firebricks within and beneath the arch are not for baking (they lack the thick subfloor heat pad – the outer support the arch, and the inner 3 allow bread or pizza to be slid in and out from the baking surface)

 

Once the oven mud was stable and we’d pulled the sand out, we started on the next layer – 4 inches of the same wood shaving/clay slip insulation that we’d used in the base. This layer went much more quickly – the insulation was simple to mix, and fast to apply and shape in big double handfuls.

Widget & Cleo loved hanging out beneath the roof-in-progress & watching us work - here, the insulation layer is almost completed
Widget & Cleo loved hanging out beneath the roof-in-progress & watching us work – here, the insulation layer is almost completed

The next day, we started the first-ever fire inside – a drying fire, which we kept going for about two straight days, speeding along the drying of the water-soaked insulation – we needed it to be mostly dry before we applied the final exterior clay, and we were quickly running out of time at Habitable Spaces.

at first, we kept the drying fire small ...
at first, we kept the drying fire small …

... but as the insulation began to harden, we grew bolder and build a sweeping wave of flame, moving the fire around the interior throughout the days and enjoying the way it moved through the oven
… but as the insulation began to harden, we grew bolder and build a sweeping wave of flame, moving the fire around the interior throughout the days and enjoying the way it moved through the oven

In order to use the oven effectively before we left, we had to dry out not just the insulation layer over the dome, but the insulation down in the base – which was now wicking moisture up, into the dome, and out into the air as the top dried out more and more.

steam exuding from the insulation, driven out by the fire inside
steam exuding from the insulation, driven out by the fire inside

While we burned the drying fire for days, we built a baking door out of cedar scraps – this would seal in the heat of the oven after a fire had heated up the clay thoroughly, the embers had been removed, and the pizza or bread or pie was inside.

cedar baking door - plugs the entrance, sealing in heat

baking door – plugs the entrance, sealing in heat

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We also mocked up a simple “fire door” – not totally necessary, but nice to have on windy days when the fire is struggling to breathe due to turbulence. Cool fresh air comes in the bottom to feed the flames, and hot gases and smoke swirl out the top of the arch and above the door.

the metal fire door also reflects radiant heat back into the oven, for added efficiency
the metal fire door also reflects radiant heat back into the oven, for added efficiency

It was rainy on the final day of the drying fire, so we put the unfinished roof over the oven as it continued to dehydrate. We prepared for the final coat by mixing up a big batch of exterior mud the day before – this consisted of a new mix:

  • some fine playground sand,
  • a bunch of subsoil (above the clay layer and beneath the topsoil – we did a soil test with a jar of water that indicated it contained mostly very fine sand),
  • some clay (about 1 part to the 2 parts of fine sand), and
  • about 3 gallons of fresh cow manure (for the smooth strength of the fine fiber of 7-times digested grass)

adding in the secret ingredient - cow poop!
adding in the secret ingredient – cow poop!

 

the exterior mud was much softer than the interior clay - squishy & without rough sharp sand in it - barefootable! (as long as a little cow poop doesn't scare ya)
the exterior mud was much softer than the interior clay – squishy & without rough sharp sand in it – barefootable! (as long as a little cow poop doesn’t scare ya)

 

cleaning out the last of the sand. the insulation layer has baked almost dry, so we let the long drying fire go out, in preparation for the final exterior clay
cleaning out the last of the sand. the insulation layer has baked almost dry, so we let the long drying fire go out, in preparation for application of the final exterior clay

 

final exterior mud
final exterior mud

 

the "Bible" told us to "schmear" the final layer on like frosting, but we found it much more effective to throw it on by the handful - "splat! splat! splat!"
the “Bible” told us to “schmear” the final layer on like frosting, but we found it much more effective to throw it on by the handful – “splat! splat! splat!”

 

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flingin’ poo

 

Once we had a 2-4″ layer of plaster mud all over, we got to work shaping and decorating – smoothing, adding flame and ember colored rocks around the base and arch, and  sculpting flames and heat waves in the mud …

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We had just two days left before we were leaving Habitable Spaces – and we were determined to be able to eat some food from the oven before we left!

So we started a new drying fire inside, knowing that the fast drying would likely lead to cracking, but willing to take our chances.

cracking of the exterior plaster due to fast drying
cracking of the exterior plaster

There was, indeed, considerable cracking due to the fast-drying action of the fire, but the scary-looking cracks turned out to be easy to fix – we waited until it was dried out and stable, then filled them in with a wet mix of the same plastering material.

The warm exterior (from the sunshine and drying fire) caused the repair slip to dry almost instantly, creating a rough surface – which led us to the discovery that some wirebrushing created a nice light color, which highlighted the flame patterns pleasantly.

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We built some tools from the junkpile (a scraper, a cleaning swab, and a fire blowing tube) – and eagerly awaited the next day: our final full day at Habitable Spaces, and the day we would finally test the oven out on some food!

We tinkered and smoothed and prepared throughout the day and the following afternoon …

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the interior reveals the clump-by-clump construction method of the oven mud layer
the interior reveals the clump-by-clump construction method of the oven mud layer

We kept the drying fire going – now it was going to provide the heat for the first baking!

Kristin prepared two kinds of pizza dough – Neapolitan & New York style, and we soaked the inside of the cedar baking door by floating it in a large bucket, in order to minimize burning/charring.

Finally, we there in the first pizza, which sizzled satisfyingly as it hit the firebrick. Within minutes, delicious scents began wafting from the narrow gaps around the baking door …

baking the first pizza behind the soaked door!
baking the first pizza behind the soaked door

 

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first pizza emerges!! (We got better at shaping the subsequent five pizzas, which had various combinations of bacon, caramelized onions, mushrooms, herbs, garlic, cheeses, pickled jalepenos ...)
first ever pizza emerges!! (We got better at shaping the subsequent five pizzas, which had various combinations of bacon, caramelized onions, mushrooms, herbs, garlic, cheeses, pickled jalepenos …)

 

And five minutes later, we pulled the first pizza from the oven. (It will take less time in the future, once the oven is finished drying out – at first, it loses efficiency to the energy that water takes to steam out.)

We baked into the night, leaving each pizza in for one minute longer than the last, until we were all too full to eat another slice and we’d exhausted our supply of ingredients. Then we threw a shortbread crust in for awhile, took it out and added a filling of blackberries, apple, ginger, and sugar, and replaced it inside for another 40 minutes of baking.

When it was done (and devoured), we used the considerable remaining heat to overnight slow cook a cast iron pot of beans with jalepenos, pepper, and cumin for our breakfast tacos the following day – our last morning at Habitable Spaces, capping off our wonderful two-month stay!

 

Postscript:

A couple of days after we left, Shane and Alison sent us the photos below – while they were soaking the door (in preparation for a bakefest of 8 pizzas & a loaf of bread), both a chicken and a cat had decided that the earth oven was a “habitable space,” indeed ….

 

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It was a lot of work but incredibly rewarding and fun – we’re looking forward to visiting again to eat from it someday … and we can’t wait to build our own, back home on our farm!!

January in Texas

In our first post from Habitable Spaces, I mentioned how when we first arrived and the van got stuck on a tree stump, it seemed like a sign of how would be rooted and grounded here.

It turns out this was more accurate than we knew – our planned three and a half week stay has transformed into a two months, as plans fell apart with the next two farms that we’d lined up.

This could have been a minor disaster, but for two things – we like Habitable Spaces, and they like us.

We’ve been having a great time settling into to the space, getting to know the people, the animals, and the area … here’s some of what we were up to throughout January!

(they’re not really in order, I assume no one really cares ….)

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This is Scout, breadloafin’.

 

where's Kristin?
where’s Kristin?

 

the mysterious trophy in the window at Dean's bar in Kingsbury. Karate racing?
the mysterious trophy in the window at Dean’s bar in Kingsbury. Karate racing?

 

Cleo don't give a duck
Cleo don’t give a duck

 

of course we had to build them a rocket stove (this one is for boiling pots of water to dunk chickens in for plucking)
of course we had to build them a rocket stove (this one is for boiling pots of water to dunk chickens in for plucking)

 

Kristin & Ali working on the bottlehouse walls
Kristin & Ali working on the bottlehouse walls

 

bottles must first have their labels removed, before being cut in half, taped to a matching size bottom, and mortared into the walls - here Seth & Kristin work the de-labelling step
bottles must first have their labels removed, before being cut in half, taped to a matching size bottom, and mortared into the walls – here Seth & Kristin work the de-labelling step

 

Shane peers through the new hole in his home's roof, in the midst of the wood stove installation (oops this pic is actually from the last days of December)
Shane peers through the new hole in his home’s roof, in the midst of the wood stove installation (oops this pic is actually from the last days of December)

 

Shane putting the finishing touches on the new woodstove chimney (oops this pic is actually from the last days of December)
Shane putting the finishing touches on the new woodstove chimney (oops this pic is actually from the last days of December)

 

Lynx spider helping us roof the bottlehouse
Lynx spider helping us roof the bottlehouse

 

Kristin working on the bottlehouse roof
Kristin working on the bottlehouse roof

 

Ali & Kristin scavenging free manure
Ali & Kristin scavenging free manure

 

scavenging beautiful big glass doors for a future kitchen addition
scavenging beautiful big glass doors for a future kitchen addition

 

every time we go for a walk with the dogs, Mina finds a mud puddle to lie in
every time we go for a walk with the dogs, Mina finds a mud puddle to lie in

 

harvesting the fruit of prickly pear cacti for making preserves (for some reason these are called "tuna fruit" which is just weird)
harvesting the fruit of prickly pear cacti for making preserves (for some reason these are called “tuna fruit” which is just weird)

 

Scout and her brother Mister Pettibone
Scout and her brother Mister Pettibone

 

Cleo beholds Bertha in her newly-built enclosure
Cleo beholds Bertha in her newly-built enclosure

 

chicken in the herb garden
chicken in the herb garden

 

Kristin deep beneath the Texan surface
Kristin deep beneath the Texan surface

 

returning to the daylight
returning to the daylight

 

BBQ in San Antonio with Jess
BBQ in San Antonio with Jess

 

RIVER SWIMMING IN JANUARY FOR THE WIN! (the San Marcos river is 73 degrees all year long)
RIVER SWIMMING IN JANUARY FOR THE WIN! (the San Marcos river is 73 degrees all year long)

things you see out the car window
things you see out the car window

 

herding Bertha across the farm to greener pastures we fenced in
herding Bertha across the farm to greener pastures we fenced in

 

Ali mortaring bottles into the wall
Ali mortaring bottles into the wall

 

excavating the ruins of an old homestead from the cacti it was buried in
excavating the ruins of an old homestead from the cacti it was buried in

 

seed starting
seed starting

 

Sunny & Cleo in the kitchen
Sunny & Cleo in the kitchen

 

the newly-cleaned and organized tiny kitchen, ready for seed trays
the newly-cleaned and organized tiny kitchen, ready for seed trays

 

Widget tries out the arboreal life
Widget tries out the arboreal life

 

leveling the foundation for the new structure
leveling the foundation for a new structure

 

clearing cacti from the new field
clearing cacti from the new field

 

beginning the fencing of the new field (to keep out deer, dogs, wild pigs, etc - and temporarily contain Bertha)
beginning the fencing of the new field (to keep out deer, dogs, wild pigs, etc – and temporarily contain Bertha)

 

new building rising
new building rising

 

Kristin found a wild boar skull, which would later become the center piece of an art project
Kristin found a wild boar skull, which would later become the center piece of an art project

 

Jacob's Well almost claimed our souls
Jacob’s Well almost claimed our souls

 

Mina usually manages to find a deer leg to parade home for gnawing
on our walks, Mina usually manages to find a deer leg to parade home for gnawing

 

metal detecting for cool old garbage out among the prickly plants
metal detecting for cool old garbage out among the prickly plants

 

decorating a cacti with found rusty debris
decorating a cacti with found rusty debris

 

Kristin and I enjoy fetching firewood for the house's woodstove - we like knocking over standing dead snags best ...
Kristin and I enjoy fetching firewood for the house’s woodstove – we like knocking over standing dead snags best …

 

Mina mauling Ali, affectionately
Mina mauling Ali, affectionately

 

basking in both sunshine and satisfaction, after completing the bottlehouse roof
basking in both sunshine and satisfaction, after completing the bottlehouse roof

 

Bertha flinging dirt
Bertha flinging dirt

 

Widget greets the day from the cabin's loft
Widget greets the day from the cabin’s loft

 

feeding the neighbors in Jess's friend Ray's backyard
feeding the neighbors in Jess’s friend Ray’s backyard

 

injured or ill vulture out in the wasteland
injured or ill vulture out in the wasteland

 

Lily enjoys the new platform after we took down the old cable spool tower
Lily enjoys the newly-accessible platform after we took down the old cable spool tower

 

the petrified wood collection so far, gathered on our walk abouts on the property
the petrified wood collection so far, gathered on our walk abouts on the property

 

preparing the new field for planting
preparing the new field for planting

 

adding a gate to the new field
adding a gate to the new field

 

returning from an attempt at making the entrance culvert a bit more accessible
returning from an attempt at making the entrance culvert a bit more accessible

 

the rocks n stuff collection is outgrowing the spool tabletop
the rocks n stuff collection is outgrowing the spool tabletop

rocks and artifacts and bones outside the cabin
rocks and artifacts and bones outside the cabin

pool at Dean's in Kingsbury
pool at Dean’s in Kingsbury

 

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remains of Shane's grandmother's old house
remains of Shane’s grandmother’s old house

 

 

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unearthed an intact Presto glass container with lid from the 40s
unearthed an intact Presto glass container with lid from the 40s

 

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Mr. Pettibone squeezes into the dog food container he knocked over, as Scout observes
Mr. Pettibone squeezes into the dog food container he knocked over, as Scout observes

 

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exploration
exploration

 

archeologistizin' the old homestead
archeologistizin’ the old homestead

 

the Kingsbury Aerodrome museum is next door ... they have many many cool toys
the Kingsbury Aerodrome museum is next door … they have many many cool toys

 

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Ali chameleoning
Ali chameleoning

 

whitewashing Craigslist Free section fence wood for interior paneling
whitewashing Craigslist Free section fence wood for purty interior paneling

 

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western San Antonio is colorful
colorful western San Antonio

 

Jess at the altar of an abandoned church
Jess at the altar of an abandoned church

 

panorama from the bottlehouse roof
panorama from the bottlehouse roof

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So that was January! We’re going to be here through February 19th before we start making our way west toward Arizona – and from there, home again in mid March to get the farm kicking! Its coming fast now … woo hoo!